Opinions, Opinions, and Onions (Cameron Cannon)

My morals are justified! Not yours!

Morals are different from one person to the next. It’s like saying someone is African-American and failing to forget how mixed their bloodline is or how huge of a continent Africa is; we are not the same. Each person has a different belief, value, family traditions and each of these factors contribute to what our morals are going to be. Marrying young is what many women in some places dream of meanwhile the average American woman would like to wait, get a career, maybe date to see who’s the best bachelor. Therefore the perfect, “ideal society” cannot exist when there are so many views on what one person should be versus what they are happy and accept into their “circle”.

It cannot be better said by other than David Brooks, author of  “This American Land”. He explains the barriers to attain such equal, perfect and accepting world.  In fact, his introduction is the most important part of understanding why any ideal society is always going to be a dream. “We’re living in the middle of a national crisis of solidarity — rising racial bitterness, pervasive distrust, political dysfunction. So what are the resources we can use to pull ourselves together? What can we draw upon to tell a better American story than the one Donald Trump tells, one that will unite us instead of dividing us, and yield hopeful answers instead of selfish ones?

Donald Trump, the President of the United States brought the giant pink elephant in the room to the light. Questionably people of all countries and states debate whether or not he is a racist or simply a blunt man. His ability to stir up a quarrel online via Twitter is not only appalling but unusual for any President America has ever seen. Since his Presidency, the number of hate crimes in America increased by twenty percent. Clearly, America is far from ideal and has a lot to do with each individual morals and expectations. But why?

Racism, of course, is the result of xenophobia – the fear of being around someone different than you. Not having anything in common is a scary situation and trying to understand a culture very far from your own can become even more difficult when “we” realize we do not look alike, speak the same language or eat the same foods. Brooks evaluates what the ideal American is and hints that everyone has an assigned place in their life using examples of characters. “The first ideal [character]was the Steward. This is the small yeoman farmer and craftsman who lives close to the soil — self-reliant, upright, humble before creation and bonded to his local community” (Brooks, 2017)

Already we can see that Brook does not separate people by race nor gender but the duty that they uphold in society. In his eyes perfect is described in the characteristics of an independent, altruistic and humble person. Steward goes far and beyond a bond for his community but respect for life in all aspects such as the soil he needs to farm.

“The second ideal was the Pioneer. This is the person who pushes against the wilderness and develops skill, courage, and virility. This is the daring innovator who ushers progress by venturing to the edge of the known……….The third ideal was the Elevated Spirit. This is the person who slips off the conformist materialism of commercial society and is both purified and enlarged by nature’s grandeur. This is John Muir in Yosemite, Ansel Adams in the Grand Canyon. (Brooks, 2017). Brooks agrees that an ideal society is where each person is free to debate and argue opinions which is contrary to Steward, the content farmer. Brooks believes in order to be an ideal society there is the basic foundation of someone’s personality; they are to respect and nurture their community as much as all forms of life but open to change and opinions in order to improve.

Brooks agrees that an ideal society is where each person is free to debate and argue opinions which is contrary to Steward, the content farmer. Brooks believes in order to be an ideal society there is the basic foundation of someone’s personality; they are to respect and nurture their community as much as all forms of life but open to change and opinions in order to improve. The factor of xenophobia and rigidity of many cultures and religions, the barrier may not ever be broken.

Xenophon believed if each child was raised the same way with his morals and his laws but also their elder’s morals he could create perfect adults who would continue this cycle. However, that is only a small part of the world and difficult to enforce in other places where women hold the authority or there may be complete anarchy. Xenophon might have disagreed with Brooks because of his own Greek values- if you are not one of us you are a barbarian and we are not open to mixing.

It is a hope one day, the world would be of one accord, however, most cities are not in and have their own laws, law enforcement and each community and sub-community have their own opinions. Marijuana is illegal in New York, however, this is still up for debate. A woman’s role in society is still up for debate and now the LGBTQ is taking center stage for acceptance and respect with other people who are very conservative.

 

Source Citation   (MLA 8th Edition)

Brooks, David. “This American Land.” New York Times, 25 Aug. 2017, p. A27(L). New York State Newspaperslogin.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=SPN.SP01&sw=w&u=nysl_me_brookcol&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CA501688108&it=r&asid=cb7b1da06fdee05150879a3ab8168630. Accessed 17 Sept. 2017.

 

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