“Then, Everything Changed When the Fire Nation Attacked. You will Learn Respect, and Suffering Will be Your Teacher.”

 

Television Show: Avatar, The Last Airbender

Season and Episode: Season 1, Episode 12 “The Storm”

Character Focus: Prince Zuko, his father, Fire Lord Ozai and his sister, Princess Azula.

In Relation To: Medea.

Show Description: This is an animation televised on the Nickelodeon Network based around a fictional world where the planet is divided into four nations, each with special earth aligning abilities. It is divided between the Fire Nation, the Water Nation, the Earth Nation and the Air Nation, all with people that are given special ‘bending’ abilities allowing them to control the elements of their alignment. The Avatar can control all elements. The Fire Nation believes that they should be in complete control and they decide to try to wipe out and take control of every other nation because they believe that they are superior. The show focuses on the protagonist, the Young Avatar, Aang and his journey to save the world with his friends along with the parallel story of Prince Zuko, the young teenager that tries to defeat the Avatar because his father has convinced him that it’s the only way to restore his honor, after her banishes him.

Episode Description: In this particular episode of the first season, “The Storm”, there is a terrible storm that has hit and it is a pivotal episode because this storm triggers flashbacks for both Aang and Zuko, both enemies from the beginning with parallel stories of abandonment and  purpose. Aang’s flashbacks make him feel guilty about running away and neglecting the responsibilities of being an Avatar for one hundred years, causing the Fire Nation to start and win the war; while Zuko’s flashbacks are of his father punishing him for speaking out against his grandfather in the father’s room and presence. He punishes Zuko by forcing a father and son duel, Zuko refuses to fight and Ozai permanently scorches and scars his eyes with fire and banishes him from the kingdom.

“Avatar: The Last Airbender” has always had underlying themes of war scattered throughout every episode and every setting that the characters ever dwell in. It’s in the dialogue, the setting and also laced heavily in flashbacks. One character in this episode says, “I guess I might have just imagined the last one hundred years of wars and suffering.” This particular episode was an episode that dealt with a lot of flashbacks, so the audience got to peer into the dynamics of the start of the war, and the people that controlled the war, not just the people on the receiving end. Looking at the dynamic of the Fire Nation, it is very similar to European Imperialism and it is showed in the imagery and setting throughout the entire show, like a divided a world in the title sequence and the Fire Nation flag hanging over other nations as a sign of conquer. They both deal with a world power wanting to dominate weaker nations to benefit off of them and remain the most powerful. It shows how a need for a resource can turn into greed at any moment and that when a little taste of victory is won, it is very easy for a nation to become power hungry.

The effects of imperialism still exist strongly within the world today, and now the goal is to subtly maintain power in the world. America has rose as a nation and unfortunately to stay on the top of the world, the requirements are to maintain some control over the rest of the world, whether it be military bases, territories or the media. As someone that grew up on the Caribbean Island of Trinidad and Tobago, I always watched American television. It was what was shown in nearly every household in my country, even American news would talk priority over the news of my own country. American media circulates the world and I think that shows a very subtle bit of power that is injected into multiple countries so that the world, whether consciously or subconsciously, engages and submits to American culture, standards and social norms.

Besides the global issues, the ideas of domestic violence has always been a struggle that society has had to deal with as a whole. Each nation throughout time has had to deal with the problems of domestic violence within the individual home and the problems of abuse, neglect and revenge. There’s often been so many instances where parents have taken out their stress and feelings of anger on children, minds that aren’t fully develop enough yet to deal with the wrath of an angry parent.

In ‘Avatar: The Last Airbender” in this specific scene that I am focusing on, Prince Zuko has spoken out to his grandpa in his father’s war room.  Prince Zuko’s father is the son of the fascist man that started the war with the other nations. I would even go so far as to comparing Fire Lord Sozin, (Zuko’s grandfather) to Hitler, it would not be surprised if the attitude of that character was modeled after any fascist ruler. In the war room, Fire Lord Sozin was speaking about using an entire faction of new soldiers in his troops as a decoy to distract an enemy while the more experienced soldiers snuck in from the rear. Prince Zuko spoke out against his grandfather and said that to sacrifice all of the new soldiers on the front lines without their knowledge is an act of betrayal. It was true what he said, and it showed that Zuko, even as a kid, understood empathy, a very important characteristic of his, extremely important to his growth in the show. Zuko’s grandfather and father were disrespected and so his father challenged him to a fight where Zuko refused to fight the man that created him. Before burning Zuko’s eye, his father says, “You will learn respect, and suffering will be your teacher.” It’s something that even my father says to me now, the idea of learning from experiences that you’re told will be painful. But not everyone experiences life the same way, and suffering is not always the teacher, nor does it mean that it’s the parents job to inflict suffering on a child just because they were taught harshly by their reality.

The troubles that must come mentally with being a fascist ruler is grand, and to take that out on your son is terrible. Ozai permanently scarred Zuko’s eye and banished him from the kingdom, sending him on what he thought was an impossible mission, awaiting his failure. While this happens, Zuko’s sister, Azula watches on with a sick smile on her face, stifling a laugh. Similarly, Medea has taken out her vengeance with her husband on her kids. After committing the act of murder on multiple people around her, she has finally indulged in the ultimate act of revenge, killing her own children. Like Azula, Medea has no sense of remorse or human feelings of regret and empathy.

Children are developing seeds that need to be nourished and filled with vitamins, not hatred. Children are not born with feelings of animosity in their hearts and are so symbolic of innocence. Her act of killing them extended beyond revenge, it turned into self-hatred, like Zuko’s father let his own cruelty poison his child.  She let the hate turn her heart so cold that she could not see the beauty in her own products, only the side of them that she didn’t want to see and the pain that she knew it would cause their father. Madea, like Ozai, did not care about the outcome of the child. She did not care about their futures, or the fact that they were kids. No matter what, a parent should never take out their anger on a child, especially if the situation that caused the anger was not directly inflicted by that child, whether that be in fiction or modern day. Children now still deal with the issues of a parent’s misdirected anger and it’s the leading cause of child depression and child abuse. It can cause much more harm to a child because their brains cannot fully make sense of things, only the idea of hatred that they’ve put onto themselves. They begin to blame themselves for the way that their parent has treated them. Their ideas of love become warped and they’ve lost a sense of their innocence because it is robbed by a selfish adult that has experienced hardship and decides to inflict that hardship on a child and possibly ruin a portion of that child’s life, or his/her life forever.

 

#Medea #TheLastAirbender #CLAS2 #TEAMAPHRODITE #Longlongagoandfarfaraway #Elsewhere #Euripides #Euripides’Medea

Temple of the Sea VS. Temple of the Earth

“Pokemon Ranger and the Temple of the Sea” (Video)

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In the final scene of Pokemon Ranger and the Temple of the Sea, the main characters. Ash and May, attempt to save the temple of the sea. The temple/palace of the sea, also known as Samiya, began to deteriorate and flood when a crystal was stolen by a pirate. Without the crystal, the palace becomes in jeopardy of being lost in the sea forever. To save the temple, the characters find and place the crystal back to it’s rightful place.

 

This scene also reflects on the current state of the Earth’s environment. The stealing of the temple’s crystal can be compared to human greed towards the Earth’s resources. People have taken natural resources such as food, water and minerals, without balancing out their actions. Human consumerism may blind our indirect actions of harming the natural state of the world. When issues such as pollution, deforestation and climate change arise, people are forced to realize that there has been little actions towards replenishing the environment. Factors such as politics, finance and cultural differences also hinders the protection of natural resources. This then causes a bigger impediment on finding a way to improve the environment to a stable state for the future. Similar to the scene of Pokemon Ranger and the Temple of the Sea, people have acknowledged the harmful changes in our surroundings. However, society has yet to step away from personal greed and to take actions for the common good.

 

In comparison to Medea, Medea was a victim to her own selfishness and greed. Throughout the play, her motive to seek vengeance on her ex-husband escalated quickly. As Medea faces the reality of her husband leaving her for the princess of Corinth, the audience is able to see Medea’s anguish grow. Her mental state changes from sorrow, bitterness, to anger. When Medea forms her plan to kill her children, husband and the royal family of Corinth, Medea reflects on herself when she sees her children for the last time. “Go, go on. I am no longer able to look at you. I am overcome by wrongs” (Euripide, line 1076). This portrays how Medea has allowed her emotions to take over her mind and actions. Despite understanding the repercussions of how she will hurt those around her, Medea continues with her plan of revenge. She disregards everyone around her in order to meet her goals, and this form of greed leads to her own downfall. At the end of the play, Medea was left childless, husbandless, and filled with loneliness. She had fulfilled her plan of inflicting pain on others, yet, she cannot escape the pain she had inflicted on herself. Her acts of outrage was a facade that temporarily allowed Medea to forget the sense of betrayal of those around her.

#Drama #CLAS2 #Medea #Vicky, Heremes

Cameron, Team Jupiter

 

This is an image of me [Cece] in my bedroom. While I was reading the final play for class on Friday, I could not help but think about some really good Greek food like Souvlaki.  While food was on my mind, I also remembered an old saying about the a olive branch but I did have any symbol like that to take a selfie with nor did I remember the saying. While shuffling through my jewelry box, I realized I a oak tree accessory for my choker I always wear.  The oak tree is a symbol in Greek Mythology usually representing several powerful gods such as “Zeus, God of Thunder,  or a symbol of physical strength and morale” (nickthegreek, ladyoftheloch.co.uk). After taking a picture, I thought how does this relate to our lessons after only ONE DAY in class?! It hit me- Medea of Euripides’ Medea held strong to her own moral compass. In her mind, the death of her own kin was validated because of her ex husband’s betrayal. Despite the several pleas of the Chorus, Medea replies  to being told she would regret her decision with “never mind all other words are in vein” (Lushnig, 818). This shows how her stubbornness and strength, much like the Oak Tree, lead her to the sacrifice of her own children. Even before going on with her plan to poison  her children, the King and Jason’s new wife, she grieved knowing what she had done as wrong. It was more upsetting for her to be betrayed and replaced than to leave in exhile. The act of committing such sacrifice  is unbearable however I must admit takes the strength of hundreds of Oak Trees.20170831_195458.jpg