Past Politics in Later Art

Classics

Image result for Intervention of the Sabine Women Jacques Louis

Jacques-Louis David (French painter, 1748-1825). Intervention of the Sabine Women, Overall view without frame. 1799 (creation), Image: 4/31/09 (creation). http://library.artstor.org/asset/SS36066_36066_23794134. Web. 1 Dec 2017.

Just like the modernist age that was discussed in Prof. Simon’s class, there is a political statement within this image. The painter himself was a man who hid many meanings within his paintings, making political paintings during the French Revolution. This was something very common in the modern age, although the traditional “fine art” techniques are still used here rather than more abstract and chaotic methods used within the modernist era. It seems the peace that the women try to bring within the image is the main interest in the subject. Further research states that he made this in a time he was jailed, where the artist stated they wanted to draw something to the more Roman aesthetic.

The quote I chose for this piece specifically comes from Vergil’s book:

“The joyful peace, which put an abrupt close to such a deplorable war, made the
Sabine women still dearer to their husbands and fathers, and most
of all to Romulus himself.”

Although even in the intervention depicted in the illustration, the war still continue to unfold, the quote shows an importance to their role.


Art

During Unit 5 we learned more about the modern world that deviated from traditional techniques. The artist’s strokes became more apparent and the subjects within the painting didn’t look like they were going to bounce out at you anymore. With that, followed abstract art, or even messy looking art that at first glance looked as though it had no purpose in a gallery, but at second glance you can see every stroke had a purpose. This was somewhat the case with Marry Cassatt’s Woman on a Bench. The artist here was trying to capture life as she saw it with the little time she had. It was a form of experimentation, which is something a lot of the modernists art had.

Now if you’re looking for something even closer to present time than that then look no further than the video games we see around us. A YouTuber by the name of The Game Theorists covered such a topic in more detail on a video called Gaming is BROKEN!  …What Comes Next? He speaks of how gaming is following the same pattern as modern art history. As time progressed, games have become more abstract and what could be considered a game or what makes a game is pretty loose with new genres being born.

We have managed to create life-like simulations within games. It looked as though you could almost touch the grass, or a video recording of the real world rather than 3D models generated through a computer. They have done an amazing job at immersing the player, making you feel like you were there, something art had striven to do. As The Game Theorist continues to point out that “…,but with so much progress and games being so beautiful and massive and textures feeling more and more real, where do you go now?”

This is where we arrive at post-modernism. All that progress and innovation removed, a rejection of modernism because “everything and anything can be art”.  We see this same idea in indie gaming today with titles such as Rock Simulator and Pony Island. These are games that break  the rules of what and how to play, and games that know their games. A trend we see in post-modernist art, where art knows it’s art. Even in some of the examples we saw in class, it was discussed that some of the artists purposely wanted you to see the painting as just that, a painting.

The difference between the past and the present is that we have become more interactive with the new art forms out there, after all even video games – something that tell stories like the paintings did – is considered art now a days.


Citations

Jacques-Louis David (French painter, 1748-1825). Intervention of the Sabine Women, Overall view without frame. 1799 (creation), Image: 4/31/09 (creation). http://library.artstor.org/asset/SS36066_36066_23794134. Web. 1 Dec 2017.

Cassatt, Marry. Woman on a Bench.1881. Pastel on Green Wove Paper.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Art History.

The Game Theorists. “Game Theory: Gaming is Broken! …What Comes Next?” Youtbe, commentary by Matthew Patrick, 26 Nov. 2017, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxzKZdTxNp8.

 

-Yekaterina Ignatyeva, Team Cronos

 

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Saving Grace

The image below is of Lucretia, a woman famous among the Roman tales for taking her own life after being raped by the then Prince of Rome. This version of her was done by artist Rembrandt van Rijn in 1664, the painting was done in a lot of earthy dark tones. In the painting her body, especially around her head seems to be creating a cast shadow, everything together seem to e blending the light and dark in the background which creates chiaroscuro. The reading extracts from Livy Book 1 mentioned that “at the arrival of her own family, tears welled in her eyes.” And in the portrait below there are no tear tracts on her face but her eyes are red which could be because she was crying before but wiped her tears and that “she took a knife that she had hidden in her garments and plunged it in her heart.” There is a knife in her hand that looks like it is aimed at heart. The description in the text is mostly consistent with the image, but there are some differences, for example how there are no tears in her eyes and the way she is holding the dagger. I suspect that the artist had these differences on purpose, the original description of the scene makes the sorrow so blatant, that it would be hard to miss, but in the artist’ version, you would have to pay attention to the details to understand what could the subject been thinking about as she tries to take to her life. Based on the details in her expression, I would say that the artist may have been more drawn to the emotional aspects of the event than the outcome.

Image result for lucretia 1664

MLA Citation: Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch. Lucretia. 1664. The National Gallery of Art (Washington, D.C.), Andrew W. Mellon Collection. http://library.artstor.org/asset/ANGAIG_10313974686. Web. 12 Dec 2017.

Sherique, Team Artemis

A Journey through Classics and the Heritage of Brooklyn College Students

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Maria Alejalva December 1st, 2017– Instagram Direct Messenger

Are you comfortable if I ask you some questions about you ethnicity and origins?  Can I write about your answers on a public class blog?

Yeah, sure I don’t mind

 Do you identify yourself with a country or ethnicity beyond the United States of America?  If so, which one?

I identify as biracial Dominican. My mother, a white Dominican woman and my father, an Afro Dominican man. When I had to do a project back in the fifth grade on my country, I learned about the origins. It was the first colonial settlement in this hemisphere and I know about the racial tensions in DR because of colonial influence, especially after our Dictator Trujillo called for a racial cleansing of Afro Dominicans.

How have you learned about the origins/history/past/importance of that place? (If they feel no strong connection to other place or identity, then ask them to talk about being American.)

Most of the information I’ve learnt came for my parents and family members, as they are natives of the country. I was born in America and have only visited maybe once or twice so there’s a bit of a disconnect. Other information I have acquired came from basic knowledge and prior research. I had to do a project back in the fifth grade on my country and there was also where I learnt about the origins.

 Is there one person, maybe a hero or ‘wiseman’ or king or law-giver, that is important to your people–someone people tell stories about, maybe legendary, maybe true?  Can you tell me a story?

Um, I would have to go with my parents and family members. For a great length of time DR was plagued with the dictatorship of Ulises Heureaux and Rafael Trujillo. My parents along with many men and women from Moca played a major role in bringing down the two dictators, and bringing democracy back to the country. This was and still is a big deal in modern Dominican Republic society. This isn’t really much of a story but it’s a factual event that I believe has been interpreted into a story through popularity.   

What values do you think that story teaches?  Are those values important in the traditions of your people?  How?

If there’s a lesson to be to learnt from this I think it would be perseverance and determination. I believe the result of where the Dominican Republic’s democratic stance is today is accredited to the peoples unity and undivided trust in one another.

 Fatema Islam – December 3rd 2017 IMessenger

Are you comfortable if I ask you some questions about you ethnicity and origins?  Can I write about your answers on a public class blog?

I guess it’s fine (She is in our learning block, Team Jupiter J)

Do you identify yourself with a country or ethnicity beyond the United States of America?  If so, which one?

I identify as a Bangladeshi. I was born in Bangladesh and only came to the United States at the age of two.

 How have you learned about the origins/history/past/importance of that place? (If they feel no strong connection to other place or identity, then ask them to talk about being American.)

I came to learn about my for my country’s origins and history through the impact that my family had while they were involved though minimal at most. I also learned through my own self-interest and research. I know how the country came into being and how my family was in involved. I also go back once in a while. I visited a few years ago so I saw how things were there. But I also identify as an American because I lived here for a long time so my values are a mix between the two

 Is there one person, maybe a hero or ‘wiseman’ or king or law-giver, that is important to your people–someone people tell stories about, maybe legendary, maybe true?  Can you tell me a story?

N/A wasn’t able to answer

 What values do you think that story teaches?  Are those values important in the traditions of your people?  How?

N/A wasn’t able to answer

 Enrique Ortiz December 7th 2017 Gmail

Are you comfortable if I ask you some questions about you ethnicity and origins?  Can I write about your answers on a public class blog?

Yes, I am more than comfortable answering questions about my ethnicity and origins

 Do you identify yourself with a country or ethnicity beyond the United States of America?  If so, which one?

I identify as a Puerto Rican-American male, but when the option isn’t given, I have to categorize myself as Hispanic/Latino, which I have no problem doing.

 How have you learned about the origins/history/past/importance of that place? (If they feel no strong connection to other place or identity, then ask them to talk about being American.)

That one is a little hard to answer with one definitive answer. It’s not like someone sat me down when I was a little kid and said “hey kid, this is your heritage.” nope, it’s something to I had to learn gradually as I got older. I grew up very disconnected from the culture I now claim, and I’ve still been trying to make up for the years I missed out on. The years that have been essential the upbringings of my friends and shaped who they are today.

 Is there one person, maybe a hero or ‘wiseman’ or king or law-giver, that is important to your people–someone people tell stories about, maybe legendary, maybe true?  Can you tell me a story?

Yeah, as Puerto Ricans, we have many figures like that, but I’m only familiar with a few. One of the more famous people would be baseball player Roberto Clemente. He was larger than life, and an athlete of the ages when he was around. Having grown up with nothing in the slums of Puerto Rico, it was astounding for many to have seen him make his way from the Puerto Rican Winter League games, to the grand stage of Major League Baseball in America, where everybody loved him. Not only was he a great player, but he was also a humanitarian and philanthropist, always giving back to the community. It was actually his love of helping people that led to his death, On December 31st, 1972, Clemente died in a plane crash as he was carrying supplies for relief in Nicaragua after a devastating earthquake. He’s been immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame as the first Latino player to be inducted, and the MLB has an award that bears his name, giving it out each season to the player who best embodies the spirit of helping and community outreach in the league.

 What values do you think that story teaches?  Are those values important in the traditions of your people?  How?

I didn’t exactly tell a story, but I can tell you why Clemente is important to us as a people. Because we come from a small, impoverished island with little opportunity, it isn’t often that someone leaves and makes it big. That’s why when it does happen, and they leave a big enough impact, they’re practically immortalized in Puerto Rican folklore as heroes who did what many could not. We’re also a very proud people, so when something important or monumental occurs involving a person that is Puerto Rican, we celebrate because it’s as though we’ve all made it.

Summary and Similarities

Every person I spoke with was a first generation American or immigrant. A similarity that all these interviewees had was that the parents offered them an opportunity in America all the while taking the privilege of knowing their own culture. A quote I found quite relevant from the text we had been reading in regards to the responses I had received from my interviews was “The less man had, the less there was greed”. I found this interesting because it highlights the sacrifice that these three interviewee’s parents or family members had taken in bringing them to America, and giving them this lifestyle. The consequence of all this was a lost culture. A good portion of my interviewees referred to themselves as American citizens: which they are. First generation and beyond. However there is a thick layer beneath that that they are unable to identify or relate with and that is their native heritage.

Another similarities that I noticed between each interview and the stories we learned about Rome is the important leader/event or movement that happened in their culture. Pride and knowledge of these historically is in their native countries/ areas is similar to that of the ancient Roman princess Juno. We learnt in classics of Juno and how she loved and had great pride in her city. “Juno loved it, they say, beyond all other lands in the world…”

Shamiso Tunduwani, Team Jupiter

 

 

Rape of the Sabine Women

 

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Citation: Corona, Pietro Da. Rape of the Sabine Women. 1627-1629. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/SS36847_36847_34553644. Web. 11 Dec 2017.

This painting belongs to the Baroque period. It stands out for its theatrical characteristics, the use of colors and light. The painting represents a Roman legend where the men of Rome committed a massive kidnapping of young women from other cities in the region.

Quote: ”The joyful peace, which put an abrupt close to such a deplorable war, made the Sabine women still dearer to their husbands and fathers, and most of all to Romulus himself.”

The quote of the reading differs with the painting because the painting represents the precise moment in which the attack was being committed, while the quote talks about the moment in which the war was over and the consequences that it brought. It is said that women were more valued by their male relatives after what happened. Finally in the painting you can see how the artist represents the violence of the act. On the other hand the quote talks about peace and a moment of tranquility after the event ended.

Jamilex Dominguez. Team Mercury.

 

 

 

Different dress

 

Cleve, Joos van, d. ca. 1540. Lucretia. 1518-1520. Kunsthaus Zürich. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/ARTSTOR_103_41822003827423. Web. 11 Dec 2017.

The image above is a depiction of Lucretia by Livy’s description from “The Rape of Lucretia.” This event happened around 500 B.C., however this painting was painted in the 1520s. The painting portrays Lucretia as a desirable person with her loose dress and showing a lot of skin. She was painted with naturalistic features and proportions. Her proportions look like a normal human and nothing really stands out to make her look idealized. Her face shows the distress she was in after being raped by Sextius Tarquinius, the tyrant’s son. Also, the painting contains contrapposto with her hip and legs facing the audience, while her arms and face is slightly turned towards the right side. This gives the impression of movement in the painting.

A quote from the reading is from Livy Book 1, “ What can be well when a woman lost her honor? The marks of another man are in your bed. But only my body has been violated; my mind is not guilty. Death will be my witness.” This quote is similar to the painting above because Lucretia stabbing herself in the heart was her way of not losing her honor. As the quote states, her “death will be [her] witness.” Lucretia wanted to die, rather than be alive and seen as a cheater of her husband, even though she got raped. The difference between the painting and the literacy is the way they depicted what she wore. The artist’s own contribution is the way he depicted Lucretia. In the story, she was described wearing a roman garb, while the artist shown Lucretia with clothing that barely covers her body. The artist, Joos Van Cleve, probably did this to show what she looked after being raped by the tyrant’s son.   

Hoky, Saturn

Aeneas Carthage

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Perino del Vaga. Venus directing Aeneas to Carthage. early 1530s. British Museum, http://www.britishmuseum.org/. http://library.artstor.org/asset/AGERNSHEIMIG_10313160280. Web. 11 Dec 2017.

This drawing shows the disguised Venus (mother of Aeneas) and Aeneas itself. Venus advises Aeneas to go to the city of Carthage. She directs him to talk to the queen of the Carthage, Dido who would warmly welcome him and his friends. Aeneas is fleeing away from his native city, Troy which has been destroyed in the war. Juno, queen of the Gods despises Aeneas so she brings various traps on Aeneas’s way so that he cannot reach Carthage. However, his mother, Venus helps him in reaching Carthage and tells him about the queen of Carthage, Dido.

I can connect this drawing to something that I learnt in Art History class. This painting has a linear perspective. Linear perspective is the illusion of three-dimensional space on the two-dimensional surface. Likewise, this drawing does look three dimensional because the orthogonals if made from the floor will meet at one point on the top which is known as vanishing point. The figures such as Venus and Aeneas are much closer to the viewer. The mountains and trees in the background seems far away. This all creates linear perspective. The colors used are white and brown. Colorful colors are not used.

“She looked like a young girl, a Spartan girl decked out in dress and gear or Thracian Harpalyce tiring out her mares, outracing the Hebrus River’s rapid tides. Hung from a shoulder, a bow that fit her grip, a huntress for all the world, she’d let her curls go streaming free in the wind, her knees were bare, her flowing skirts hitched up with the tight knots.” (Vergil’s Aenied Book 1). This quote is very similar to the picture that I chose. Venus in the picture actually looks like a young girl. Both the quote and the picture portrays that her knees are bare and her skirt is hitched up in the tight knots. In addition to the similarities, there are few differences between the quote and the image that I chose. In the picture, there is something that hangs from her shoulder but it doesn’t look like a bow which contrasts to the quote because it says that a bow hangs from the shoulder. In the image we see that her hair is tied with no open curls. However, the reading says that her curls streamed free in the air.

Some of the artist’s own inventions in the drawing are the trees, few animals, people and the mountains. The artist might have added these details to describe the setting of the scene. Since, Venus and Aeneas met each other in the forest, the artist uses these details like animals, trees, bushes, etc. to the convey the idea that that they are in the forests.

The two figures, Venus and Aeneas most interests the artist. Since they are the main subject of the work, he draws them the way they look with all the characteristics that they actually have. There are movements in their posture because they both are pointing their arms and legs in forward direction which depicts that Venus is directing Aeneas to Carthage. The homework texts also has Venus and Aeneas as important figures because the text is all about Aeneas’s journey to Carthage and his mother, Venus helping him to reach there.

Gurleen Kaur, Team Venus

The Lady and the Sea Monster

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Domenico Guidi (Italian, 1625-1701) Commissioned by Francesco II, Duke of Mantua and Reggio (Italian, 1660-1694) , who died before the sculpture’s completion. Andromeda and the Sea Monster. 1694. The Metropolitan Museum of Art,
http://www.metmuseum.org. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/SS7731421_7731421_11776266. Web. 11 Dec 2017.

This sculpture, though made in the Common Era, resembles traits of a Hellenistic sculpture from Ancient Greece. The depiction of Andromeda in this fluid like movement is very common in Hellenistic style art as well as noticing how the free-standing Andromeda is much like new upcoming sculptures in BCE. Having the subject in the nude like so relates to how the Greeks shaped their art to show how the human body should be shown off as such, as it is in the Gods image.
This piece of art can relate to a quote from the Vergil’s Aeneid, Book 1:

“Her fury inflamed by all this, the daughter of Saturn drove over endless oceans Trojans left by the Greeks and brute Achilles. Juno kept them far from Latium, forced by the Fates to wander round the seas of the world, year in, year out. Such a long hard labor it was to found the Roman people.”

The sculpture of Andromeda is in relation to Greek art, and not Roman art. We can clearly tell by observing how the breasts of Andromeda are revealed and not hidden by shrubbery. Greek and Roman themes do relate sometimes, where we can see how Andromeda, goddess of dreams, who usually accompanies with Poseidon, can be like the daughter of Saturn. Both are strong mythological female figures, with relation to “driving over endless oceans” They differ from their cultural origins, but both parts of Greco-Roman mythology can be connected.

The artist wanted to try his best, from a 17thy century perspective, to copy an old time Greek sculpture to the best of their ability. The artist Domenico Guidi, was a prominent Baroque sculptor, who had a short life as an artist. His intentions for creating art are not that important for the relation to Roman era literature, since they are two different time periods.

Sean Reilly, Team Artemis

Sabine women:)

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MLA format: 

Orley, Nikolaus van (Netherlandish (before 1600) – Flanders, act.1550-ca.1586/91) (author of design) [painter]; Herzeele, Joost van (Netherlandish (before 1600) – Flanders, act.1570-1585) (workshop) [Weaver]. Romans admiring Sabine women, Story of Sabine women, Story of Romans and Sabines, Cleveland/Metropolitan Museum of Art set. c. 1570-1586. United States, Ohio, Cleveland, Cleveland Museum of Art, http://www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/photo_study_collection/, French & Co. purchased from Henry Symons, Inc., received 9/15/1927; sold to John L. Severance 8/7/1928.. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/GETTY_GGTAP_1031172027. Web. 11 Dec 2017.

This is  Flemish textile designed by Nikolaus Orley. Because it was made during the 16th century this work may represent a Renaissance style. Orley illustrated here Sabine women. Figures on this piece look so idealistic and smooth. In addition, the fact that designer was inspired by Roman stories suggest that this work was made in Renaissance style. Women here looks so calm and gentle. The textile is decorated with lots of flowers which make this work even more beautiful. In the title, it says: “ Roman soldiers admire Sabine women” which could mean that Sabine women were really beautiful and Roman soldiers so they look at them with enthusiasm. I think that’s not only because they are gorgeous, but also, that they did something important for Rome.

In the reading Vergil’s Aeneid, Book 1. It says: “Then it was that the Sabine women, whose wrongs had led to the war, throwing off all womanish fears in their distress, went boldly into the midst of the flying missiles with disheveled hair and rent garments. Running across the space between the two armies they tried to stop any further fighting and calm the excited passions by appealing to their fathers in the one army and their husbands in the other not to bring upon themselves a curse by staining their hands with the blood of a father-in-law or a son-in-law nor upon their posterity the taint of parricide.” Here in the reading main focus is on war and effect of Sabine family on it. Therefore these women helped soldiers at war and in this painting they are depicted as glorifying women.

-Yuliya K, Team Minerva

Aeneas and Achates

 

 

Carthage Aeneas and Achates

 

This image that I chose is called Carthage: Aeneas and Achates by David Cox. This painting in my opinion uses chiaroscuro because the trees on the sides of the paintings are painted in dark colors while the water and city in which the two men are walking towards are painted in lighter shades of white and blue. This is in order to give attention to the vast water and city in the far away distance. This painting also includes linear perspective because it is able to bring a three dimensional perspective on a two dimensional surface. The painting gives the viewer the illusion  that they are viewing this scenery from a higher point than the two men. A quote from the excerpts of Vergil book one that would relate to this picture is, “Aeneas puts in here with a bare seven warships saved from his whole fleet. How keen their longing for dry land underfoot as the Trojans disembark, taking hold of the earth, their last best hope, and fling their brine-wracked bodies on the sand.” This quote that I choose is similar to the painting in that it describes their longing for dry land which they would illusion to be like the painting above. The difference is that in contrary to the violent and gruesome scene described in the quote, the above painting reflects a more calm and peaceful environment. I believe that the artist includes the vast view of the ocean to help give the viewer know that the Romans had a vast empire as well.

Ashley G. ~ Team Juno

Aeneas and Venus

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image cite: Jean Cornu (French, Paris 1650-1710 Lisieux). Venus Giving Arms to Aeneas. 1704. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, http://www.metmuseum.org. http://library.artstor.org/asset/SS7731421_7731421_11284669. Web. 11 Dec 2017.

This sculpture was built in 1650-1710 which was the later reign of Louis XIV witnessed the real explosion of the real Baroque sculpture community dedicated to the classical myths of the past. The faces of every characters that’s the part of this sculpture all looks externally real, the faces were all expressing the different emotion, you can almost hear what they want to say. It was the moment when the goddess Venus descended from the sky and showed her son, the Prince of Troy Aeneas, a spectacular armor. As a supplement to the story, Aeneas’s half-sister Cupid raised his shield. The clothes that they wearing doesn’t looks rigid like a sculpture but real clothes that was blowing by winds, you can see where the winds came from.

This is the sculpture makes me think about the story in the ‘Aeneas meets his Mother’ in Vergil’s Aeneid, Book 1. Aeneas and Archates collide with Venus who’s a young female hunter as they enter the forest. Aeneas knows what happened and asked the woman what goddess she is. Venus disguised, said she was just an ordinary girl in the forest. Venus will fill Aeneas when what’s going on in the city. Then, she ended her story, and asked Aeneas who he is. Aeneas answered with his name, his pursuit of his favorite color. Finally, he said how he was attacked in the storm, lost a bunch of companions. Venus comforted him with story of twelve swans and eagle. Then the goddess turned away and Aeneas recognized her (“He knew her at once—his mother”). He called and said: “Why, you too, cruel as the rest? So often you ridicule your son with your disguises! Why can’t we clasp hands, embrace each other, exchange some words, speak out, and tell the truth?” But Venus did not answer. Instead, she wrapped Enias and Archates in the fog, invisible. This made them in the heart of Carthage. Around them, people are busy building bees in the new city. After this story, Aeneas’ face in the sculpture seems to expressing a emotion dejected and doesn’t want Venus to leave him.

 

Yao, Team Zeus

A Trojanpiece

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Apollonio di Giovanni di Tommaso, Italian, Florence, ca. 1415/17 – 1465. Aeneas at Carthage. ca. 1450. Yale University Art Gallery, Early European Art, http://artgallery.yale.edu/, University Purchase from James Jackson Jarves. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/AYALEARTIG_10312577055. Web. 10 Dec 2017.

This piece shows the different parts and an overall summary of Aeneas at Carthage from Virgil’s Aeneid. From left to right you see Aeneas, Dido, the construction of Carthage, and a glorified Rome. Dido is in the temple of Juno meeting Cloanthus along with other Trojans. In the temple you can see a part from the Trojan war that shows Achilles dragging Hector’s body. You can also see the wooden horse that was used to get into Troy. In the glorified Rome, you can clearly identify structures like the Santa Maria and Pantheon that we’ve learned in Art History. This piece also gives us an example of linear perspective as was discussed in a previous class. Your eyes are led straight into the middle of the scene on the gold piece in the center.  The paining tells a story throughout with different scenes, but your attention gets focused on the center, at the temple of Juno.

The part that stood out most interesting to me was what was going on in the temple of Juno. In the story, we read that when Aeneas arrived at the temple, it was truly amazing. According to Virgil’s Aeneid, Aeneas comes across something, “—all at once he sees,
spread out from first to last, the battles fought at Troy, the fame of the Trojan War now known throughout the world.” While exploring the temple, he sees the battles at Troy which we can see in the painting. This was very painful for him to look at, as he was brought to tears. The painter probably decided to show because this turns out to be an important part in the story. Aeneas spends a good amount of time examining the battles and being “spellbound” as brought out in book one. Later on in book two, we have Aeneas explaining to Dido what happened at the Trojan War. This is the centerpiece of the painting that ties the whole work of art together.

Ivory, Team Artemis

Lucretia’s Downfall

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Citation: Crespi,Giuseppe Maria. Tarquin and Lucretia. c. 1695-1700. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/SS36847_36847_35977795. Web. 10 Dec 2017.

This image is called Tarquin and Lucretia by Giuseppe Maria Crespi. This painting was created c. 1695-1700 during the Baroque art period. The Baroque period in art was a period in art where artists depicted biblical and mythological stories and used dramatic realism and illusionism to engage the viewers looking at these paintings. Many of these painting achieved this effect by using dramatic lighting and tightly cropped compositions. This painting depicts the scene when Sextus Tarquininus rapes Lucretia, the wife of Tarquin’s fellow soldier and who later killed herself after being raped by Tarquin. An indicator that this painting is from the Baroque period is its use of chiaroscuro lighting. Chiaroscuro lighting is an extreme contrast between light and darkness. It can also be identified as a Baroque painting because of its vibrant use of color. This can be seen in the gold of Tarquin’s clothes and the blue of Lucretia’s dress. This painting also uses tightly cropped composition to show the struggle between Lucretia and Tarquin.

This image depicts a scene from Livy’s Book 1. In this book, Livy tells the story about Tarquin and Lucretia. In the story, Tarquin becomes obsessed with Lucretia after her husband describes her beauty and lets him watch her weaving with her maids. He then sneaks into her room when she is sleeping, threatens her life by saying that he would kill her and a slave and say she was an adulterer, rapes her, and then leaves. After the rape, Lucretia sends a messenger to her father and her husband to come home because something terrible happened. When they come, she tells them what happened and makes them swear to avenge her. They agree to avenge her and inconsolable in her grief, she pulls out a knife and kills herself by stabbing herself in the heart. Before she kills herself, she says, “Nor henceforth shall any unchaste woman continue to live by citing the precedent of Lucretia” (Livy 11). This means that she does not want to be seen as an unfaithful woman and to prevent from being seen as one, she killed herself.

There are many similarities and differences between how the painting and the story depict the scene. One similarity between the depictions is that both depict the rape in Lucretia’s bedroom. Another similarity is that both depict and convey the feeling of fear that Lucretia was feeling and the aggression of Tarquin. One difference is that in the story Lucretia is woken up from her bed and was frozen in fear. In the painting, Lucretia appears to be wide awake and fighting Tarquin’s advances. This appears to be the artist’s own invention to make the painting more dynamic, rather than having Lucretia just sit there while Tarquin threatens her with a sword. By making the painting more dynamic, the viewer is more engaged in the story and the painting. Another difference is that Tarquin threatens Lucretia with a sword in the story and in the painting, Tarquin doesn’t have a sword. The struggle between Lucretia and Tarquin is what interests Crepsi the most. Livy is more interested in the threats that Lucretia received from Tarquin and the after effects of the rape rather than the actually rape itself. Through these details, Livy and Crepsi are able to vividly describe the rape and death of Lucretia.

-Emily Ryan, Team Mars

Lucretia and Olympia

 

Lucas Cranach the elder. Lucretia. 1532. Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Wien, inv. 557.. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/LESSING_ART_1039789025. Web. 9 Dec 2017.

The work of art I found is entitled, Lucretia it was created by Lucas Cranach the elder in 1542 and is a painting; the medium is distemper on wood. The description relates that’s the painting depicts a “Roman noblewoman and wife of Tarquinius Collatinus, [who] killed herself after being raped by the son of Tarquinius Superbus, last King of Rome.” The artist Lucas Cranach the elder is German (Western) and the year competed is during the Renaissance. There was a re-emergence of the significance of female nude as a genre during the renaissance in Western art.  Though it is supposed to be a somber scene, Lucretia is painted nude, distracting the audience with her idealized body. She appears soft which enhances the sensuality and sexuality of the piece. She is standing in contrapposto and a motion like stance. Also she is holding an extremely sheer piece of fabric in her left hand as it rests over her right forearm and the sword that she is soon going to drive into her chest is in her right arm. In her face we can sense her sorrow, tilted head and her drooping sad eyes gazing off into the dark space. The background is dark almost black, adding to the dramatization of the scene.

In Edouard Manet’s Olympia of 1863, though it is three centuries after, the female body was and still is objectified in art. It is viewed and represented as a symbol of fertility, sexuality, sensuality, and seductively. This tradition goes all the way back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. Olympia is a prostitute and unlike Lucretia, her body was not painted to be idealized or perfected. Manet challenges those established ideas and simply paints a real woman in an apartment in Paris. Instead of standing like Lucretia, she is laying down. She is painted to look quite flat and angular and we can’t see any brushstrokes. Unlike Lucretia, Olympia is gazing directly at us which blatantly emphasizes her sexuality.

Livy book 1 describes the account of Sextus Tarquinius raping Lucretia and her suicide. It all began with his obsession with Lucretia. One night when he along with other young princes were drunk, Livy states, “Not only her beauty but also her proven chastity spurred him on” (Livy 161). When he caught her alone, he threatened to kill her if she didn’t sleep with him and murder a slave and place him naked next to her naked as false evidence that she committed adultery and to ruin her reputation. So, she allowed him to rape her, called her father and husband afterwards and told them what had happened so that her name wouldn’t be tarnished. The account goes on to say that they found her sitting, with tears in her eyes quite different from Lucas Cranach the elder’s rendering of her. Also unlike the painting, she wasn’t alone when she killed herself as others were attempting to console her  by, “shifting the guilt from the woman who had been forced to the man who had done the wrong” (Livy 164). One last difference between the painting is that while she is nude in the painting, the literary version describes her to be clothed. “She took a knife that she had hidden in her garments and plunged in in her heart” (Livy 166). I infer that the artist made this choices to add to the dramatization of the scenes depiction and to the sensuality of Lucretia.

– Chanté, Team Venus

 

 

Cant live like this

Screenshot 2017-12-09 16.36.23Philippe Bertrand (French, 1663-1724). Lucretia. 1704 or earlier. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, http://www.metmuseum.org. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/SS7731421_7731421_11291927. Web. 9 Dec 2017.

The image above is a sculpture of Lucretia stabbing herself in the chest. She is sculpted as a fluid figure. She has an ideal Roman body. Her dress sticks to her and flows without concealing her body similar to that of the “Three goddesses from the east pediment of the Parthenon”. Although that sculpture was made to accommodate slope of pediment, the sculpture of Lucretia was not. However this sculpture also leans in a slope. The clothe hanging off of her hand looks very thick as opposed to the one her body which appears thin.

“They found Lucretia sitting in her bedchamber, grieving. At the arrival of her own family, tears welled in her eyes. In response to her husband’s question, “Is everything all right?”, she replied, “Not at all”. (Livy 58)

This image is similar to the text because it show Lucretia on her “bedchamber” and the grief in her face. It showed the outcome of her pain. The difference between the picture and the quote is the time frame, she hadn’t stabbed herself yet.

The artist made her head lean back and her face the way it is to possibly portray her grief and to make it more vivid to viewers. He also left one of her breasts uncovered, that may have been his way to portray the feelings Lucretia had, that she was not honorable anymore. It seems to be that the artist interest was to show Lucretia ending her life. I think this was the most important part of that text. She killed herself to show “unchaste” women it wasn’t acceptable to live life after such a horrible event occurs to you.

-Anora, Team Diana

The Shepherd and the Babies

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Nicholas Mignard, French, 1606 – 1668. The Shepherd Faustulus Bringing Romulus and Remus to His Wife. 1654. Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, Texas, USA, Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Algur H. Meadows and the Meadows Foundation, Incorporated, 1970.25, http://www.dallasmuseumofart.org/. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/AMICO_DALLAS_103842291. Web. 9 Dec 2017.

This painting was created in 1654 in the Renaissance period. It has a lot of classical imagery, regarding to the idealistic figures. The women have soft skin and curvy bodies. The man, who is Faustrulus has a muscular body. It also has chiaroscuro lighting. You can see the lighting shown on the skin and drapery of the women, the man, and the two babies. The babies are Romulus and Remus. You can see the darkness and shadows inside the house and in the background.

Quote: “According to the story, his name was Faustulus. He took the children to his hut and gave them to his wife Larentia to bring up”(Vergil’s Aeneid, Book 1. Page 11). There are a lot of similarities between the quote and the painting. Faustulus is the man carrying the babies. He is bring them to his wife, Larentia, who is also in the painting and is reaching out to the babies. The quote is basically describing what’s happening in the painting. Though, the quote did not mention the names of the two other women in the picture, it also did not mention that there is a dog and two doves.

The artist might have added the dog into the painting to represent that Larentia was known as the “she-wolf”. Dogs are closely related to wolves. Though the story is a Roman Myth, there are some biblical sayings in the painting. The two white doves are symbols of the holy spirit. Faustulus is a shepherd, which is a figure used a lot in the Bible.

What most interests the artist is the classical tradition and idealized bodies. The artist seemed more interest in his work than the myth itself. As an artist in the renaissance, they want to do their best work to bring out the symbols and realism. The artist did a good job making the roman myth come to life in a painting, so yes, it is important.

Caroline, Team Cronos

The Abduction

Nicolas Poussin, French, 1594-1665. The Abduction of the Sabine Women. probably 1633-34. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, http://www.metmuseum.org. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/MMA_IAP_1039651425. Web. 8 Dec 2017.

This painting “The Abduction of the Sabine Women” by Nicolas Poussin depicts the story of the rape of the Sabine Women. This is the moment where Roman men abducted Sabine Women to take as wives and start family, as the Romans are fighting off the women’s husbands and fathers. This art work was painted in 1633-34 which would have been during the Baroque period. Professor Simon has taught us that with a new era come a different type of art style. How during the Baroque period new methods such as chiaroscuro lighting which created more emotion to the subject came into play. The painting uses methods such as chiaroscuro lighting and you can see the constraint between the light and the dark that the shadows are creating, making the piece more dramatic. The artist is also trying to play with linear perspective by showing the people father away in the background fighting by making them smaller, creating depth.

The quote I choose was from Book one of Vergil’s Aeneid that says ”Then it was that the Sabine women, whose wrongs had led to the war, throwing off all womanish fears in their distress, went boldly into the midst of the flying missiles with disheveled hair and rent garments. Running across the space between the two armies they tried to stop any further fighting” like the quote the image is showing the throwing of women, you can see the destress in their bodies and how it looks like they are fighting back to get away. You can see the intensity of the men fighting just the the quote is describing. I think the artist added a lot of details to the Romans muscles making them seem stronger to show their power over the women and men. The artist also added children and it really shows that these women are being taken away from their families. However in the quote they make it seem as it was the Sabine’s fault for not giving the women to Romans in the first place. In the art you see more ofthe brutality of abducting these women.

Francesca Faiello, Team Cronos

Lucretia

Image result for lucretia rembrandt van rijn 1664

Rembrandt Van Rijn. Lucretia. 1664. http://library.artstor.org/asset/SS36847_36847_36038086. Web. 8 Dec 2017.

In this painting is the depiction of Lucretia from The Rape of Lucretia as recounted by Livy. This story took place in sixth century BC during the reign of the tyrant known as Tarquinius Superbus. This depiction of Lucretia may be somewhat inaccurate in regards to the clothing she wears; the story took place in 600 BC, yet the clothes she wears in this painting suggests the Renaissance (from 14th-17th Century AD).

Lucretia is shown to have naturalistic proportions as her proportions look like a normal human and makes her appear life-like. Her pose is somewhat awkward, though there is still the impression that motion is present in this painting due to the contrapposto of her somewhat twisted body.

From Livy Book 1: “But only my body has been violated; my mind is not guilty. Death will be my witness.”

This painting is similar to the literary version because of the knife that Lucretia holds in her right hand. In The Rape of Lucretia, she chooses to take her own life to “regain her honor” after being raped by Sextius Tarquinius, the tyrant’s son. In the painting she is holding the knife and has a somewhat distraught expression present on her face. The difference between the painted version and the literary version is the style of her clothes as the painted version depicts her wearing a dress and jewelry from a completely different time period from when the literary version took place. The artist’s own contribution was the way Lucretia is dressed; instead of wearing Roman garbs.

 

-Stacy, Team Minerva

When in Rome, Do as Infants do.

romulus

Peter Paul Rubens. Romulus and Remus. Pinacoteca capitolina (Rome, Italy). http://library.artstor.org/asset/LESSING_ART_10310119992. Web. 6 Dec 2017.

 

Peter Paul Rubens is one of the artists discussed in Art 1010. The painting we discussed exclusively was “Elevation of the Cross” that showed the religious power during the time. As Professor Simon repeatedly says: “A change in era/time/politics equals a change in the form of art.  This work of art, similar to the “Elevation of the Cross” is also a piece of Baroque work, identified by its use of chiaroscuro (the contrast of light and dark in a painting to give a dramatic effect). The painting is given depth using a form of linear perspective where the two infants are in the center (center point) while everyone else takes to the background. The babies, both pale and pink are clean, protected by the she-wolf which tells the story of the twins, Romulus and Remus.

Then one, Romulus,
reveling in the tawny pelt of a wolf that nursed him,
will inherit the line and build the walls of Mars
and after his own name, call his people Romans.

Excerpts from Vergil’s Aeneid
Book 1

This image is literally the story of Romulus and Remus. Were twin brothers. Legend has it, they were the founders of Rome. Their mother, a Vestal Virgin, claimed she had been violated by Mars, the god of war. She was thrown into prison and the children were ordered to be drowned in the Tiber River for the sin her mother committed (breaking her vow not have sex). Rape was overlooked and women were thrown in jail for making such accusations. The twins survived. They were brought to a sacred fig tree and were protected by a she-wolf and a woodpecker that watched over them and brought them food.

The wolf is seen lying under a tree giving suck to an infant, while another plays nearby. The herdsman, Faustulus, who discovered them, is approaching. The god of the River Tiber reclines on his urn. Under the rule of Romulus the city of Rome grew in size and strength. Ruben highlights the survival of the twins being a great and wondrous gift. They are the center and bright part of the image so he wants them to be noticed.

The reason this image is the most important to me and for the homework is because it give a direct approach and visual to what the twins looked like when they were found by the huntsman in the woods. Romulus is reaching to the sky as if he knows that he is the kin of Mars- the Roman god of war. This supports how Rome got it’s name although it is a mere myth.

Cameron Team Jupiter

A Grotesque Image

Rape of the Sabine Women

Citation: Giambologna. Rape of the Sabine Women. 1582. http://library.artstor.org/asset/SCALA_ARCHIVES_1039928770. Web. 5 Dec 2017.

Description of Image: This sculpture appears to be made of marble. The main subject of the sculpture is the young woman who looks to be in distress. The sculptor brings out eyes up to her through the use of the two other figures who are looking up at her. The man on the very bottom is very muscular, even more so than the one above him. All thee subjects are expressing vivid emotion, though their facial expressions and the movements of their limbs. The woman is pushing away the young man holding her, appearing to cry out for help. The man crouching in the bottom also appears to be horrified by what he is seeing, using his left hand to cover his eyes and the rest of his body to push away. The young man in the middle stands tall and strong, holding the woman in his tight grip, despite her protest and appears oblivious to the man crouching at his feet.

Quote: “At a given signal, the Roman youths rushed in every direction to seize the unmarried women.” (Livy Book 1)

Similarities: Both the text and sculpture depict the same image: a woman being taken without her will. The woman in the sculpture looks surprised, her mouth agape, as the man ambushes her. She pushes against him to try to get away, but the Roman man persists; he needs a wife to have children to carry on the newly enriched Roman Empire.  Both the text and image show the kidnapping of neighboring women but the sculpture has one deviation. The man crouching at the bottom is not per-taking in the kidnapping of the maiden. In fact, he looks at the act in horror. The question of “why?” is raised here: he too, is a man so why isn’t he kidnapping a woman to be his wife as well?  My guess is that he is the woman’s father, imploring the Roman youth not to kidnap his daughter.

I think that thought the addition of the father figure, the artist depicted the rape of the Sabine women in a negative light. The artist wanted to show that this was a horrible crime and that the abducted women were violated. The artist follows the description in the text, although the text justifies and somewhat glorifies the kidnapping of the Sabine women. The artist’s sculpture is more emotional and shows the true horror of the kidnappings.

Elene T., Team Mars

 

The Rivers of Rome

2001.456 002tiber.jpg

I searched for the foundations of Rome in Artstor and I came across this sculpture. According to the description this sculpture depicts the Nile and it’s river children. From an art perspective this sculpture is Al-antica, in the style of ancient Rome. Despite being made in 1785, this sculpture emulates the style of the Hellenistic Era. The grapes represent divinity in roman culture. The sphinx is most likely an ode to the fact that the Nile runs through Egypt, on a slight tangent there was a very noticeable Egyptian influence in early Greek artwork, like the Kouros we learned about in Art. The hair and body of the main subject are both very naturalistic, The hair looks as if wind is flowing through it. The body curves and the stomach rolls up like any human stomach does. The body proportions are idealized as well.

The Nile river does not have much to do with our current classics unit however, the Tiber river is mentioned numerous times. This sculpture is also very clearly inspired by a personification of the Tiber river made in 1500’s Italy (pictured on the right for clarity). The artist was interested in expressing the godlike quality of the river. The Tiber river plays an important role, connected to the heavens, in Vergil’s Aeneid. ” the priestess was thrown into prison, the boys were ordered to be thrown into the river. By a heaven-sent
chance it happened that the Tiber was then overflowing its banks,and stretches of standing water prevented any approach to the main channel.” In this part of the story the lives of the priestess’ twins were saved.

The artist chose to include the Sphinx which, was not in Tiber’s sculpture, to demonstrate the different location. The cornucopia is the same in both sculptures, they are meant to demonstrate the fertile soils and agriculture that surround the rivers.

Zunaira Naveed Team Mars

Nile

“Artstor.” Artstor, library.artstor.org/#/asset/SS7731421_7731421_11678512.

Tiber

“What’s in a Name?” The Roman God Tiberinus, http://www.tiberinus.com/Public/What%27sInAName.html.

 

There’s a She-Wolf in the Closet

wolf titties

Image decription

This image depicts the mythology surrounding Romulus’s birth and nurture. According to legend, the rape of a Sabine Woman (Rhea Silvia) by the god Mars resulted in the birth of twins Romulus and Remus. Rhea was so ashamed of the births she rid herself of the children. Romulus and Remus were then found, suckled, and raised by a she-wolf.

Supporting quote from Vergil’s Aeneid

” The tradition goes on
to say that after the floating cradle in which the boys had been
exposed had been left by the retreating water on dry land, a thirsty
she-wolf from the surrounding hills, attracted by the crying of the
children, came to them, gave them her teats to suck and was so
gentle towards them that the king’s flock-master found her licking
the boys with her tongue. ”

Similarities and differences

The image is consistent with the tale of Romolus and Remus. The boys are depicted as suckling the wolf with her standing over them in a protective, almost maternal way.

Artist’s contributions

The artist depicts a playfulness between Romulus and Remus not discussed in the text. This is most likely meant to communicate the familial nature of the scene and enforce the she-wolf’s nurturing of the boys.

What most interests the artist?

The artist is most interested by the tale of the she-wolf. The piece of plain and straightforward in its intent to communicate the relationship between the wolf and the boys. While this is the focal point of the art piece, it is not a large part of the text.

Sophie, Team Juno

Cornell Gem Impressions Collection. “Brooklyn College Subscription Resource Login Required.” ASTOR, ASTOR, library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/#/asset/SS35941_35941_22903711.

The Sabine Women Who Were Spirited Away

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Jan Muller, 1571-1628, Adriaen de Vries. A Roman Abducting a Sabine Woman;, Un Romain enlevant une Sabine. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/BARTSCH_1690

The image above depicts a dramatized version of the Rape of Sabines. It is an engraving, which uses its monochromatic scheme, in order to emphasize the subject, this being the brutalization of the Sabine woman by the Roman man. The piece has a pale, soft background, which is juxstaposed by the foreground which is harsh, with clearly visible contrast between black and white, rather than the more totally mute gray. By having the ‘soft’ background give way to a ‘harsh’ foreground, the abductuion of the woman is made  all the more palpable. She is shown writhing against the her attacker, trying to struggle free, though in vain. She has. One arm pushing the man away, and another being held onto by the Roman man. Her feet are similarly in a state of movement, showing that her attempt to break freee is not a half- hearted one. The Roman man on the other hand is clearly portrayed as a brute. While the woman had a cloth, that was ripped away from her, the man is completely nude, without the slightest hint of embarrassment. This makes him seem like a beast,  a rightful depiction to make, considering his position in the matter. He is full of bulging muscles, yet the body is uncanny. The Classical Greek/ Roman ideal body in drawings and sculpture was indeed muscular, but not to the almost grotesque degree depicted. In this image, the man, and by extension, the whole of the Roman men are depicted as savage beasts, forcefully and mercilessly attacking women, both physically and sexually.

“… and the Roman youth dashed in all directions to carry off the maidens who were present. The larger part were carried off indiscriminately… The abuducted maidens were quite as despondent and indignant. Romulus, however, went around in person, and pointed out to them that it was all owing to the pride of their parents in denying right of intermarriage to their neighbors (Vergil’s Aeneid).”

It is certainly correct to say that both the engraving and Vergil’s account depict the Rape of the Sabines. However, I feel that the similarities end there. In theory, the same story is shown, but in actuality, two different stories are being told. The best way to describe this would be to say that Muller’s engraving captures the view of the Sabine women’s parents while Vergil’s writing captures that of the Romans. Since more of this history is told from the Roman point of view, it would be right to assume that the purpose of Muller’s engraving was to shed light on the anguish of the parents. Vergil’s account of the Rape of the Sabines, essentially makes it out not to be a rape. If anything, the women and their parents are characterized as being overly difficult in the face of the ‘reasonable’ demands of the Romans. Rather than view themselves as agrressors and sexual predators, they blame the Sabine people for being too unaccomodating, forcing them to have to take the women by force. The rape and abduction is not even written as a traumatic experience, like the image by Muller shows. Instead, it written in the account in a way that is comparable to a tantrum, on the part of the Sabine women, that has to be pacified by the ever -so admirable Romans.

Skaie Cooper, Team Ares

The Wolf Stands Alone

     2017-11-28 (4)

     The sculpture above portrays who the Roman people once considered to be the founders of Rome , Romulus and his brother Remus.Romulus and Remus are curdled in the furs of a wolf due to the understanding that it is believed that the wolf acted as their mother and raised them , when they were abandoned as infants..This is proven because in the text it says “the boys had been exposed had been left by the retreating water on dry land, a thirsty she-wolf from the surrounding hills, attracted by the crying of the children, came to them, gave them her teats to suck and was so gentle towards them that the king’s flock-master found her licking the boys with her tongue”. This sculpture is an accurate portrayal of  what actually happened in history and the text The only difference is that the infants were discovered by the Tiber river and the sculpture doesn’t acknowledge the importance of the surrounding history about Romulus and Remus. The artist contributes raw history to the artwork and it can be shown that the origins of Rome is important for the artist to convey.

Correspondingly, this relates to what we are learning in art in that these ideas are portrayed in modern art.

Screenshot_20171210-173152~2

This shirt portrays a modern more abstract almost surrealist view of Romulus and Remus. It is s considered surrealist due to the fact that it isn’t a solid picture, but an artist creative interpretation of it.We can tell due to the fact that the baby forms are created from a series of lines.Of course this is different compared to most surrealist art in that it isn’t a completely unique idea or portrayl.Additionally, this can also be compared to The Red Studio by Mattisse in that it uses but the use of lines and negative space to create a concept.

Samantha, Team Minerva

Citation

She-wolf nursing Romulus and Remus. 16th century. Musée du Louvre, inv. M.R. 1649.. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/LESSING_ART_10311441198. Web. 28 Nov 2017.

Foundations of Rome

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MLA Citation:

Domitian, Emperor of Rome (Roman, 51-96), patron. Via Sacra, Arch of Titus, general view. 1st century, Image: May 2000. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/AROGERSIG_10312566519. Web. 27 Nov 2017.

The image shown above represents foundations of Rome. In art history, we discussed the arch of Constantine which is located in Rome, Italy. The image shown above is very similar to the arch of Constantine, they’re both created from concrete and has an arch adorning the center of the foundation. Besides that arch, another aspect that was discussed in art history, was the columns. Here, the arch has two corinthian columns besides the arch which serves for decorative purposes as well as a support system.

“The envoys argued that cities too, like everything else, start from the most humble beginnings, that great wealth and a great name are achieved by those cities that are helped by their own valor and the gods” This quote taken from Livy Book 1 page 6. What ties the quote to the picture is that the idea of architecture helping a city present their wealth. It seems that arches, columns and huge architectural monuments in general are a great way of showing off wealth and how grand a city can be. What is different about this literary piece and the image presented above is that these architectural pieces aren’t created by gods.

The artist/creator of this architectural piece added corinthian columns as well as a large arch to possibly show entry into a city the creator values. These details show how ancient roman work is incorporated into modern works. It seems that the fundamentals of building a sturdy yet visually pleasing architectural piece is important and interesting to the artist and the homework text commemorates the contributions that brave gods made while creating an extraordinary city.

Sunzida, team Athena

The Wolf Stands Alone

2017-11-28 (4)

The sculpture above portrays who the Roman people once considered to be the founders of Rome , Romulus and his brother Remus.Romulus and Remus are curdled in the furs of a wolf due to the understanding that it is believed that the wolf acted as their mother and raised them , when they were abandoned as infants..This is proven because in the text it says “the boys had been exposed had been left by the retreating water on dry land, a thirsty she-wolf from the surrounding hills, attracted by the crying of the children, came to them, gave them her teats to suck and was so gentle towards them that the king’s flock-master found her licking the boys with her tongue”. This sculpture is an accurate portrayal of what actually happened in history and the text The only difference is that the infants were discovered by the Tiber river and the sculpture doesn’t acknowledge the importance of the surrounding history about Romulus and Remus. The artist contributes raw history to the artwork and it can be shown that the origins of Rome is important for the artist to convey.

Samantha, Team Minerva

Citation

She-wolf nursing Romulus and Remus. 16th century. Musée du Louvre, inv. M.R. 1649.. http://library.artstor.org.ez-proxy.brooklyn.cuny.edu:2048/asset/LESSING_ART_10311441198. Web. 27 Nov 2017.