“Just face it, that’s your fate”

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Put yourself in this situation; you’re in your own home lying on the floor, injured and helpless when suddenly a bunch of intruders come to capture you, tie you down, start speaking a completely foreign language and before you even get a chance to understand what’s going on, you’re killed. You never got the chance to even comprehend the situation, but you did feel every moment of distress while in captivity. Don’t worry, im not talking about a human here. So now when I say this, you may be thinking “thank god she’s writing about an animal, and it wasn’t an actual person that was slaughtered”. But don’t animals have families? Feelings? Senses?  In general, animals we slaughter for food are sensitive and defenseless, yet most slaughtering are done in a proper way. But what if it were done for the amusement of yourself, and well, others.
In the article Man charged in ‘barbaric’ killing of injured kangaroo by Amanda Woods of The New York Post, a 43 year-old man from Melbourne, Austrailia was “nabbed” and arrested after a gruesome and inhumane video emerged of him killing an injured kangaroo. “The killing of this kangaroo is barbaric and cruel and we expect the police to prosecute the man involved,” World Animal Protection Senior Campaign Manager Ben Pearson said in a statement to the outlet. From what i understood in this article, his actions were deemed ‘barbaric’ because (1) he killed an injured kangaroo when he could’ve merely helped it, and (2) he as well as onlookers laughed while he took action.

The term ‘Barbaric’ is defined as savagely cruel; exceedingly brutal. Generally, an act that is barbaric is extreme, and disliked. The manner in which the 43 year-old  killed the kangaroo is what I personally, would call “the other”. No person in their right mind does something cruel like this. The target audience for this article would most likely be animal lovers, as well as the general public. Which leads me to the connection i thought this term had with what we have learned in our Classics class. In Herodotus, where it says “Then these men, with cheers encouraging one another, drew their daggers, and stabbing those who strove to withstand them…” relates to the way the people reacted when the man killed the kangaroo. They laughed, and just looked instead of helping. This cheering may have encouraged the guy, making him sensless to his actions.

Woods, Amanda. “Man charged in ‘barbaric’ killing of injured kangaroo.” New York Post, New York Post, 1 Sept. 2017, nypost.com/2017/09/01/man-charged-in-barbaric-killing-of-injured-kangaroo/. Accessed 10 Sept. 2017.

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The One and Only

In Greek mythology, Aphrodite was seen as a Goddess who had but one purpose, and her purpose was to make love. The Horae welcomed her, and adorned her with the finest gold, ornaments, and cloth. I remember a song that came out back in 2013 called “Dark Horse” by the singer Katy Perry. In her song, she sort of hints to her lover that she has the power to do just about anything and everything, just like Aphrodite did (when it came to love). In her song, she says “Make me your Aphrodite, Make me your one and only, But don’t make me your enemy”. The lyric basically transliterates to saying that Perry wants to be uplifted to such a level as Aphrodite was, that he worship her, and in return will be sexually satisfied. She wants a whole lot of devotion, and undivided love from her lover just as Aphrodite was worshipped. She sends out a warning not to cross her path.

In the ‘Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite’ Translated by William Blake Tyrell, lines 31-34 state “In every temple of the Gods, she is honored, and among all mortals, she is of the gods, the one venerated. Their minds Aphrodite cannot persuade or subdue, but of all others, not one has escaped her”. Just as indicated in this hymn, no one other than 3 women had escaped the so-called “manipulation” of Aphrodite. For every action, there is a reaction, and in her song, Katy Perry warns her lover to be careful what he wishes for. One translation of the hymn we read in class reveals to us that one of Aphrodite’s closest lovers was Ares. Almost all of Olympia knew about her affair with him, while she was with Hepheastus. After finding out, Hepheastus was pretty much furious and exposed them while they were in bed to all the rest of the Gods in Olympia. All the Gods did was laugh at him, and in the end, though he literally demanded punishment, nothing was done and things went back to how they were before. Aphrodite was involved in an adulterous affair, trapped to the bed in which she was in with Ares, but in the end, she never recieved any punishment because, well Aphrodite was just Aphrodite.

#Aphrodite #CLAS1 #Sumaiya,TeamVesta